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The street where journalism ends

Bernard Weinraub, former entertainment reporter for The New York Times, writes about what it’s like to be a journalist at Hollywood and Vine. The basic lesson seems to be that you can’t fully stand apart from the world about which you’re reporting. Hollywood, despite its excesses, does not seem to be a special case: Reporters embedded in the financial world, DC or in a foreign capital must face the same situation, albeit with fewer Hummers and tiaras in view. Access is the currency and humans remain human.

Too bad Weinraub wasn’t writing a blog during all those years. We would have gotten a sense of the winds buffeting him as he tried to stand tall. Plus, the dishing have been fabulous.

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2 Responses to “The street where journalism ends”

  1. Read James Fallows’s Breaking the News (1996). He paints the same picture. No blog needed. One tale is about James Warren, who came to Washington as the bureau chief for the Chicago Tribune in 1994. One of his outputs was a Sunday column entitled “Weekly Watch” where he did this very dishing on the incestuous intermingling between reporters and government people. Again, no blog needed. After a year he was sucked into the punditocracy himself, appearing on Capital Gang Sunday. This 2004 NYU profile holds that he’s stuck by his principles in the long run; he’s now Deputy Managing Editor of the Trib.

    I’ll return Fallows’s book to the Brookline Library in a week, so you can take it out (302.23 F196b)

    Jon

  2. And so the plot thickens

    The repercussions of Kittengate have offically gone international. Another whistleblower,
    who calls himself "Kaiser", ,
    who calls himself "Kaiser",

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