Joho the Blog » [2b2k] Open Access articles accelerate science?

[2b2k] Open Access articles accelerate science?

A study by Gunther Eysenbach in PLoS Biology suggests that open access articles “are more immediately recognized and cited by peers than non-OA articles published in the same journal.” Therefore, he concludes, “OA is likely to benefit science by accelerating dissemination and uptake of research findings.”

The study consisted of comparing citations among OA and non-OA articles published June 8, 2004 – December 20, 2004, in PNAS: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Thanks to Don Marti for the link.)

2 Responses to “[2b2k] Open Access articles accelerate science?”

  1. See: Bibliography of Findings on the Open Access Impact Advantage (since 2004)

  2. It is more than the system of scholarly publishing that is broken. Look one step farther down (up?) the chain, and you come to the system of tenure award that mandates publication in (tres expensive) tier-1 journals, that in turn necessitates citations from tier-1 journals, that in turn gives certain publishing groups de facto monopolies to charge what they claim are “good value” prices.

    Although tenure might have once ensured so-called academic freedom (a myth, really, since during an academic’s most productive years they are anything but free because of the politics of tenure and promotion), that system is considerably broken and abused. Eliminate tenure in favour of continuing appointments (and while you’re at it, eliminate the principle of at-will employment), and that will, in time, reduce the strangle-hold these journals have on academics.

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