Joho the Blog » 2011 » April

April 29, 2011

Berkman Buzz

This week’s Berkman Buzz:

  • danah boyd gets kicked off tumblr by a company and writes about getting her identity back:
    link

  • Doc Searls chronicles the recent public debate about personal data:
    link

  • Dan Gillmor does not support the blogger lawsuit against Huffington Post:
    link

  • Ethan Zuckerman explores the roles facts and values play in polarization:
    link

  • Stop Badware is developing best practices for malware reporting:
    link

  • Weekly Global Voices: “Rwanda: Ask Rwandan President Questions on YouTube”:
    link

3 Comments »

April 27, 2011

You snooze, you looze. Also, if you execute poorly

BoingBoing lauds a new book called “Go the Fuck to Sleep,” by Adam Mansbach, with illustrations by Ricardo Cort├ęs.

I’ve been thinking for the past couple of months about seeing if someone wanted to do illustrations for a similar project I posted under a CC license in 2004: “Now Go to Damn Sleep: A Children’s Book for Parents. ” Now it would be a tad redundant.

I trust that Adam has done a better job with the topic than I did. I was never very happy with my mastery of meter.

1 Comment »

America is not so easily fooled!

So, sure, “President” Obama has released his long-form birth certificate. But where’s the proof that Hawaii is a state?

WHERE’S HAWAII’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE? WHAT IS IT TRYING TO HIDE? DEMAND THE TRUTH AMERICA! OTHERWISE THIS USURPER WILL MAKE US LOOK LIKE FOOLS!!!!!

6 Comments »

April 26, 2011

Michael Porter’s Shared Value vs Don’t Be Evil

Harvard Business Review has just posted my response to the article by Michael Porter and Mark Kramer in which they propose moving business to a strategy that includes creating Shared Value. Obviously I support the idea of businesses taking seriously their obligation to create a better, sustainable world. But I’m not as optimistic about businesses embracing that strategy solely on the grounds that Porter and Kramer propose.

It’ll make the HBR folks happier — and therefore me too — if you comment there rather than here.

Be the first to comment »

April 25, 2011

8th graders make awesome Net neutrality explainer

Congratulations to eighth graders Melissa Yu, Katy Becker, and Sara Atkins for winning first prize in C-SPAN’s StudentCam contest. Their 7:45 minute video explainer of Net neutrality — the policy and the politics — is clear, fair, and smart.

3 Comments »

The touch of metadata

Here’s a surprisingly touching video from Jon Voss, touting the power of metadata:

I say “surprisingly touching” because it is about metadata, after all. Linked Open Data, to be exact. Or maybe it’s just me.

Be the first to comment »

April 23, 2011

How the robots bid a book up to $23,000,000 at Amazon

Michael Eisen has a terrific post in which he does the detective work to figure out how dueling algorithms from two competing bookstores drove the price of a book about flies up to $23,698,655.93.

I’m sorry that some human noticed and backed the prices down. I would have liked to have seen a financial bubble form as the price went into the trillions.

1 Comment »

Things elephants fear

To mice we can now add bees. Also, ants, beggars, and the unknown.

(Tip o’ the hat to Mark Dionne for the bees.)

Be the first to comment »

April 22, 2011

Berkman Buzz

This week’s Berkman Buzz:

  • Ethan Zuckerman [twitter:ethanz] documents Internet filtering at the National Science Foundation: link

  • Radio Berkman talks to Steven Levy about the Googleplex: link

  • The OpenNet Initiative covers the Ugandan government’s new Internet filtering attempts: link

  • The Citizen Media Law Project [twitter:citmedialaw] reviews recent Righthaven copyright cases: link

  • Weekly Global Voices [twitter:globalvoices] : “Chile: Nurse Expedites Organ Transport Using Twitter”: link

  • Be the first to comment »

April 21, 2011

Big Data Models: Help me crowdsource sources

I’m thrilled that I’m going to be writing an article for Scientific American on big data models — models that cover some huge swath of life, such as the economy, the climate, sociopolitical change, etc. What’s the promise and what are the challenges? How far can such models scale?

So, who do you think I should interview? What projects strike you as particularly illuminating? Let me know in the comments, or at selfevident.com.


Thanks!

3 Comments »

Next Page »