Joho the Blogmoi Archives - Joho the Blog

July 26, 2016

Media grandparents

I just got my copy of Exploring the Roots of Digital and Media Literacy through Personal Narrative, edited by Renee Hobbs. The subtitle could be “How I met my grandparents,” where the grandparents are crucial figures in the history of media studies.

The essays take a fruitful approach. In each of the chapters, someone in the field recounts how s/he first encountered a figure who became important to her/him and why that person mattered. That entails explaining the figure’s ideas and place in the history of media studies — although almost none of the figures would have characterized their work as being within that relatively newly-minted field.

I write about how Heidegger’s ideas about language pulled me out of an adolescent “identity crisis” [draft]. Lance Strate explains his struggle to understand McLuhan (I feel his pain!) and how the struggle paid off for him. Cynthia Lewis connects her interest in Mikhail Bakhtin to her precocious recognition that “the presence of other interpreters always already exists” in the words one hears and uses. Michael Robbgrieco explains how Foucault became a crucial thinker for him about media and education, even though Foucault doesn’t talk about the former and views the latter primarily as a system of oppression, which was far from Michael’s experience as a teacher. Henry Jenkins talks about how Raymond Williams’ work spoke to him as a son of a construction company owner in Georgia, and how that led Jenkins to John Fiske who had been tutored by Williams.

These are just a few of the seventeen essays.

The personal approach enables the authors to walks us through their intellectual grandparents’ ideas the way they first did — and the paths these authors took clearly worked for them. It simultaneously makes clear why those grandparents, with their often quite difficult ideas, mattered so personally to the authors. Overall it works splendidly. All credit to Renee.

 


 

Errata: For the imaginary record, I want to note that an error was introduced into my chapter on Heidegger. Somehow John William Miller’s ‘ “mid world” mutated into “mind world” and I did not catch it in the copy-edit phase. Also “a preacher of narcissism” became “a preacher or narcissist.” I should have caught these attempts to make my text better. Ack.

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October 22, 2012

Busy, tired me

If I don’t blog much over the next week, it’s because I’m doing everything I can to become an incubator of airplane-borne diseases. This morning I spoke at the excellent Internet Librarian conference in Monterey, then I’m on to NYC for the World Technology Awards, where Too Big to Know is shortlisted, then on Wednesday I’m in Chicago for Learning 3.0, where I’m keynoting plus arguing with Andrew Keen, then Thursday at Northeastern U. where I’m giving a breakfast talk on Open Access, and finally on Thursday night I’m going to the Genoa Science Festival for two days to give a talk and to support the Italian publisher of Too Big to Know. Ah, yes, just a typical week.

I’m on the first leg, and I’m already exhausted.

(And sorry that this is a braggy, self-centered, low-value post. I’ve decided I should do these occasionally. For example, it matters to me that because of 2b2k I’m one of five finalists for a technology communication award. I’m not proud that it matters to me — I’d like to be above it all — but it does.)

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September 23, 2012

A happy day

I don’t often blog about purely personal events, but our daughter Leah is getting married this morning to her friend Matt.

Yay!!!

 


The next day: It was a wonderful wedding, joining two wonderful, loving people. We’re all very, very happy.

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February 4, 2012

[2b2k] Moi moi moi

Steve Cottle has done a great job live-blogging my wrap-up talk at the [email protected] event. Thanks, Steve!

I was the guest on Tummelvision a couple of nights ago, which is podcast tumble-tumult of persons and ideas. It doesn’t get much more fun than that. Thanks, Heather, Kevin, and Deb!

The Berkman Center has posted the video of my book talk. Look on the bottom left to find the player and the links.

KMWorld’s Hugh McKellar has posted his interview with me.

And NYTECH has just posted a video of my talk there on Jan 25. The talk is about 45 mins and then there’s a lively Q&A. Thanks NY TECH!

Brandeins has posted an interview with Doc Searls and me about Cluetrain. (They translated it into German.)

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March 18, 2010

[moi] BBC interviews for The Virtual Rvolution

As part of its commitment to openness, the BBC has posted (actually, a few months ago) under a generous-but-not-CC license edited versions of the interviews it did for it’s TV series, The Virtual Revolution. This admirably includes interviews of those who did not make it into the series. Hence, mine is available.

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March 7, 2010

[moi] [2b2k] Interview on universities and open access

I was honored a few weeks ago to be the special guest and keynoter of Oklahoma State University’s Research Week. Here’s an interview with OSU Prof. Bill Handy. [LATER that morning: Here’s a page where OSU students are commenting on it.]

[NEXT DAY:] Several open access advocates are annoyed with me because I seem to imply, against my better knowledge, that open access journals are not peer reviewed. I do know better and almost always make that point when talking about open access. More important is the point itself: Many open access journals (e.g., PLOS.org) are indeed peer-reviewed.

I do have to point out for the record, however, that (despite the title of screen of this interview) I am not a professor at Harvard or anywhere. (I’m open to offers though.) I am a senior researcher at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society. That is not a faculty position, and does not carry either the obligations or the prestige of one.

(Also, the overly-attentive reader will have noticed that I have switched from the [ahole] preface to [moi]. I introduced the former this year as part of my resolution to be a bigger ahole about blogging interviews I’ve done. But, I found myself blogging interviews I’ve done with other people under titles such as “[ahole] Interview of Mary Jones,” implying that Mary Jones is the ahole. So, from now on, it’s [moi].”

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