Joho the Blogpodcasts Archives - Joho the Blog

August 8, 2017

Messy meaning

Steve Thomas [twitter: @stevelibrarian] of the Circulating Ideas podcast interviews me about the messiness of meaning, library innovation, and educating against fake news.

You can listen to it here.

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June 22, 2014

This Week in Law: Not all that legal

On Friday I was part of the This Week in Law vidcast, hosted by my it’s-been-too-long friend Denise Howell [twitter: dhowell], along with Nina Paley [twitter: gorgeous + righteous. You must see it. That is an order.) It was a non-lawyerly discussion, which I was relieved to find out not because I dislike lawyers but because I could not have participated except by intermittently interjecting, “I object! On the grounds of say what now?”

Anyway, I can’t remember everything we talked about, except I know there was stuff about the effficacy of online advertising, the emerging norms for privacy, Amazon’s weaponized drones, Google Real-Death Bumper Cars, and nude photos of Robert Scoble.

You can get the vidcast/audiocast here. It’s a 1:35 long, where the first digit represents HOURS.

 


A Nina sample:

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December 27, 2013

A gift of Schiff

I know it’s the day after the day after Christmas, but I’m still going to give you a gift. A gift of Schiff.

I heard Andras Schiff on the radio a couple of days ago and it reminded me how much I’ve enjoyed his discussions of Beethoven’s piano sonatas before he’s performed them. He plays with passion but has an analytic understanding of the compositions. And, no, I’m not sure why I used “but” as the conjunction in that sentence.

Anyway, you can download the lectures here, thanks to The Guardian. (Thank you, The Guardian!)

Schiff said on the radio the other day that as he gets older, his understanding increases but his technical ability decreases. It makes me hope that we get some software that lets a master like him manipulate musical notation to produce a digital version of the performance that he would have liked to be able to give. Or will it turn out that there are so many variables for how you strike a note and string them together that such software is like wishing that Meryl Streep could instruct a digitizal avatar to act as well as she does?

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August 7, 2013

Radio Berkman is a Top 9 tech podcast, according to Verge

I’m a little bit proud that Radio Berkman is on The Verge’s list of top 9 technology podcasts.

Radio Berkman is produced by Daniel Dennis Jones (twitter: blanket) who does a fabulous job and deserves the credit for this. The podcasts are generally 20-30 mins, although they go longer when it makes sense to. Generally they are interviews with people passing through the Center. (I am the interviewer in many of them.)

Yay for Radio Berkman!

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April 1, 2013

Podcast about the DPLA’s status and its relation to public libraries

The latest podcast in the Digital Campus series focuses solely on the current state of the Digital Public Library of America. The discussion includes Dan Cohen who has just accepted the position of Executive Director of the DPLA, which is just wonderful news. Not only does he have a rare combination of skills and experiences — ever hear of Zotero, hmm? — but he is also — and there’s no other way of putting this — nice.

Also on the podcast is Nicholas Carr, who wrote an excellent, skeptical (or at least questioning) article for MIT Tech Review on the DPLA a year ago. Also, Mills Kelly and Tom Scheinfeldt. And me.

Dan explains what the DPLA is. Nick wonders if if the DPLA will hurt public libraries. I try to explain why I think it won’t. Amanda suggests the DPLA is the Mr. Potato Head of libraries. I thought it was a good discussion.

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February 19, 2012

[2b2k] Moi moi moi

I was on On the Media this morning. I love OTM, a radio show that loves the Internet, and I love Brooke, so this was a thrill. In fact, I was so smitten, and Brooke’s questions were so good and hard — not antagonistic, just thoughtful and hard to answer — that I gave barely coherent replies. Fortunately, they managed to find 6.5 minutes in which I didn’t ramble off the pike too far.

Also, AOL TV ran a 1.5 minute piece with me in their “You’ve Got…” series. Embarrassing story: In the first take, I confidently looked in the camera and gave their standard opening: “This is David Weinberger, and you have…zettabytes!” The friendly folks (I had a good time) politely asked me to try again. I thought I’d said it with appropriate verve, but it turns out that with a two-word opening, I still managed to get it wrong. It’s “You’ve got…” not “You have…” (In the next take, I nailed those two words, the professional that I am.)

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November 21, 2011

James Boyle on three frames for copyright

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November 7, 2011

Avi Warshavsky on the future of textbooks

I’ve posted a brief video interview with Avi Warshavsky of the Center for Educational Technology, the leading textbook publisher in Israel. Avi is a thoughtful and innovative software guy who has been experimenting with new ways of structuring textbooks.

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November 1, 2011

[2b2k] Interview with Kevin Kelly on What Libraries Want

Dan Jones just posted my Library Lab Podcast conversation with Kevin Kelly, of whom I’m a great admirer.

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Eric Frank on Creative Commons textbooks

Eric Frank is the co-founder of Flat World Knowledge, a company that publishes online textbooks that are free via a browser, but cost money if you want to download them. It’s a really interesting model. I interview him here.

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