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Episcopalian Rector prohibited from adopting Muslim rituals for Lent

According to an article at St. Louis Today by Cynthia Billhartz Gregorian of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Steve Lawlor, a part-time rector at an Episcopal church took up elements of Islamic ritual for Lent.

On Wednesday, the first day of Lent, he began performing salah five times a day, by facing east, toward Mecca, and praying to Allah. He also started studying the Quran and following Islamic dietary restrictions by abstaining from alcohol, pork and fish. During Holy Week, he planned to fast from dawn to sunset as Muslims do during Ramadan.

He avoided rituals that would have conflicted with church doctrine; for example, he skipped the prayers declaring Mohammed to be G-d’s prophet.

Steve did this as a way of understanding Islam, especially in the light of the McCarthyite hearings being held by Rep. Peter King.

But, Bishop George Wayne Smith considered it to be a forsaking of his Christianity, and to be play-acting. The Bishop forbade Steve from continuing, saying:

“I believe what he’s trying to accomplish or says he’s trying to accomplish, which is to deepen his understanding of Islam, is admirable,” he continued. “But you dishonor another faith by pretending to take it on. You build bridges by building relationships with neighbors who are Muslim.”

Not an unreasonable statement, nor an islamophobic one (although we could have done without the “or says he’s trying to accomplish” statement of distrust). But, it’s a false disjunction. You can build bridges both ways. More important, what Steve was doing was not quite pretending. Rather, it was enacting the rituals and finding in them similarities of meaning. I can understand the Bishop’s discomfort with this. For example, as I understand it, Jews are forbidden from kneeling while praying, and thus could not perform the five daily prayers the Muslim way, for ritual has meaning. That’s why performing — enacting — another religion’s rituals can help in understanding that religion. Performing another religion’s rituals thus is subject to contradictory objections: (a) The performance of empty gestures is mere play-acting and thus disrespectful. Or, (b) the performance of ritual is never mere play-acting because ritual always carries inner meaning, so performing the rituals of another religion is transgressive of one’s own religion.

Yet, between these poles of negativity there can be respectful intent, the possibility of genuinely furthering one’s understanding, and make a statement of shared humanity in the face of the shameful fear-mongering of Rep. King and his followers.


Two references, of very different sorts. First, there’s Stephen Colbert’s bit about giving up Christianity for Lent. Second, Islamicate mentions (in the post where I found the link to the “Muslim for Lent” story) that s/he has spent the past six weeks in an Episocpal seminary. Fascinating.

4 Responses to “Episcopalian Rector prohibited from adopting Muslim rituals for Lent”

  1. Christian mystics have practiced buddhist meditation for centuries.

    If ritual is viewed as a performance then it becomes merely the way in which one worships one’s religion rather than one’s deity.

    Steve Lawler was seeking an understanding of Islam through direct experience of its rituals. He could have chosen to read a book about these rituals, but he chose the practices themselves.

    I offer several quotations by Stanislav Grof from – The Conscious Revolution.

    ” a religion should provide for its members, means and support for spiritual experiences. However,often that is not the case! As a matter of fact, personal spiritual experiences are quite threatening for organized religions, because they make their members independent of the organization, of the belief system.”

    “If a person would have a true mystical experience in one of today’s churches, an average priest would probably send him or her to a psychiatrist.”

    “Once a religion is organized, direct transpersonal experiences occur mostly in its mystical or monastic orders where there is actual spiritual practice – meditation,fasting, prayers.”

    “For the mystics, nature and their own bodies play the role of the temple. Their connections with the divine is direct and does not need any mediators”

    Steve Lawler was seeking a direct experience of the divine. Bishop Smith is demanding obedience to the beliefs of the Episcopal Church.

    Our government guarantees Freedom of Religious Belief, but our religions deny freedom of religious practice to their members.

    Adam Leitman Bailey, who is my former student and athlete, is an attorney who has chosen to defend the right of the Muslim Community to build a mosque somewhat near to Ground Zero in New York City. I am most proud of his tenacious defense of religious freedom in America and for the statement he makes in the video below.

    Yesterday he presented his case in front of the Supreme Court of New York. In light of David’s comparison of the King hearings to McCarthyite hearings it is interesting to listen to the Fox News clip posted below where the desire to build the Mosque is characterized as “Un-American”.

    What could be more American than Religious Freedom!

  2. Here is the video link:

  3. (I fixed a typo in the title – dw)

  4. Early muslims would pray in church, if there were no mosque handy, for example http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/196402/towers.of.islam.htm
    There was also a strain of Islamic poetry that showed a great deal of familiarity with Christian mass, its symbolism and so on.

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