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Raider of the Lost Lawsuits

Here’s an amazing video from StooTV that shows Raiders of the Lost Ark paired with identical shots from 30 different adventure movies made between 1919 and 1973. Yup, that’s how culture works…at least if we let it.

(via metafilter)

10 Responses to “Raider of the Lost Lawsuits”

  1. http://www.amazon.com/End-Poem-Oxford-Lectures/dp/0374531005/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1325432952&sr=8-4

    In The End of the Poem, Paul Muldoon dazzlingly explores a diverse group of poems, from Yeats’s “All Souls’ Night” to Stevie Smith’s “I Remember” to Fernando Pessoa’s “Autopsychography.” Muldoon reminds us that the word “poem” comes, via French, from the Latin and Greek: “a thing made or created.” He asks: Can a poem ever be a free-standing structure, or must it always interface with the whole of its author’s bibliography–and biography? Muldoon explores the boundlessness created by influence, what Robert Frost meant when he insisted that “the way to read a poem in prose or verse is in the light of all the other poems ever written.”

  2. […] Raider of the Lost Lawsuits […]

  3. This is just like G.N., Knauer, Die Aeneis und Homer: Studien zur poetischen Technik Vergils mit Listen der Homerzitate in der Aeneis.(Göttingen 1964)

  4. […] StooTV that shows Raiders of the Lost Ark paired with identical shots from 30 different adventure movies made between 1919 and 1973. Yup, that’s how culture works…at least if we let it. (via) […]

  5. […] Check it out! […]

  6. […] in iOS »Think Raiders of the Lost Ark is Original?By C.G. | Published: January 2, 2012From Joho The Blog via Boing Boing:I like Raiders of the Lost Ark. I think it’s a classic movie that should be […]

  7. The question here is whether Lucas deliberately remade all those shots, or whether he wrote his own heavily influenced by them.

    The latter happens all the time. Constantly.

    People aren’t always aware of the way they copy things, and a great many excellent derivative works are produced entirely unconsciously of their source materials. I think that’s a good thing, really, and as a huge fan of adventure fiction I don’t have much of a problem with this sort of thing happening.

    Somewhat more egregious is the extent to which Temple of Doom blatantly copied King Solomon’s Mines [which I saw some years later, and had to check to see which came first]. Still, that was a clear case of a god thing done better – which, again, happens all the time.

    in a sense, this is why the whole Copyright issue is a minefield at the moment, and why it’s so incredibly important for concepts and ideas to remain free. Had Lucas been sued for every apparent scene theft here, Last Crusade probably couldn’t have been made. Or Empire Strikes Back.

    and we’d all have been a damned site poorer for that.

  8. […] Boing Boing och Joho the Blog film • Indiana Jones • kopiering • Raiders of the Lost Ark • Raiders of the […]

  9. […] Ark” paid homage to earlier movie sequences without sweating permissions. Oh, for those days [Joho] “Cultural gems that should be in the public domain today” [Atlantic Wire, […]

  10. Why bother with this argument? One of Spielberg’s most famous robberies is Poltergeist, a Xerox copy of the Twilight Zone episode “Little Girl Lost”. Google:

    Spielberg Poltergeist Matheson

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