Joho the Blog » When the Web was young and neither was I

When the Web was young and neither was I

Christian Sandvig has a fun post that looks back at his home page from 20 years. (Your “home page” was a place where you could express yourself to others on the World Wide Web.)


Unfortunately, the earliest versions of my home page (hperorg.com/evident.com) and of my newsletter site (hyperorg.com) archived by Archive.org’s WayBack Machine date back only to 1998. Here they are: Evident Hyperorg (and here are screen captures: Evident Hyperorg).


Evident was the home page for my business, Evident Marketing, Inc. I registered that domain in 1994, I think, so I know I had a home page up for a few years before the archived one. Likewise, Hyperorg.com was the site for my JOHO newsletter (Journal of the Hyperlinked Organization), and it had been running for a couple of years before 1998.

I was surprised that Hyperorg page didn’t have instructions for surviving a nuclear war, but Google helped me to remember that that was on its own page. Here are the two key illustrations, both taken from How to Survive an Atomic Bomb, by Richard Gerstell, Ph.D., Consultant to the Civil Defense Board (Bantam Books, NYC, 1952).

Lie face down in a ditch to survive a nuke

Wear a hat to survive a nuke

My old font graphic was there, though:

know your fonts, period

And then there’s this lovely animated gif I made to explain the basic principle of the Hyperlinked Organization:

know your fonts, period

I think that’s self-explanatory, don’t you?

2 Responses to “When the Web was young and neither was I”

  1. I really like it that you had instructions for surviving a nuclear war. That’s just the kind of thing that made sense then. Of course that would be on your home page.

  2. I fondly remember the hat one and only remember the furrow a little. Of course, these days with the absence of broad brimmed hats, I guess we are in trouble. Baseball caps might help a little, but most seem to wear them with the bills to the side or back which might not allow time to get them in the right, and all-important, position. Nothing like a hat in a nuclear explosion-except, perhaps, the desk we were supposed to retreat to in high school.

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