Joho the Blog[liveblog] Google AI Conference - Joho the Blog

[liveblog] Google AI Conference

I am, surprisingly, at the first PAIR (People + AI Research) conference at Google, in Cambridge. There are about 100 people here, maybe half from Google. The official topic is: “How do humans and AI work together? How can AI benefit everyone?” I’ve already had three eye-opening conversations and the conference hasn’t even begun yet. (The conference seems admirably gender-balanced in audience and speakers.)

NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Omitting key information. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters. Paraphrasing badly. Not running a spellpchecker. Mangling other people’s ideas and words. You are warned, people.

The great Martin Wattenberg (half of Wattenberg – Fernanda Viéga) kicks it off, introducing John Giannandrea, a VP at Google in charge of AI, search, and more. “We’ve been putting a lot of effort into using inclusive data sets.”

John says that every vertical will affected by this. “It’s important to get the humanistic side of this right.” He says there are 1,300 languages spoken world wide, so if you want to reach everyone with tech, machine learning can help. Likewise with health care, e.g. diagnosing retinal problems caused by diabetes. Likewise with social media.

PAIR intends to use engineering and analysis to augment expert intelligence, i.e., professionals in their jobs, creative people, etc. And “how do we remain inclusive? How do we make sure this tech is available to everyone and isn’t used just by an elite?”

He’s going to talk about interpretability, controllability, and accessibility.

Interpretability. Google has replaced all of its language translation software with neural network-based AI. He shows an example of Hemingway translated into Japanese and then back into English. It’s excellent but still partially wrong. A visualization tool shows a cluster of three strings in three languages, showing that the system has clustered them together because they are translations of the same sentence. [I hope I’m getting this right.] Another example: a photo of integrated gradients hows that the system has identified a photo as a fire boat because of the streams of water coming from it. “We’re just getting started on this.” “We need to invest in tools to understand the models.”

Controllability. These systems learn from labeled data provided by humans. “We’ve been putting a lot of effort into using inclusive data sets.” He shows a tool that lets you visuallly inspect the data to see the facets present in them. He shows another example of identifying differences to build more robust models. “We had people worldwide draw sketches. E.g., draw a sketch of a chair.” In different cultures people draw different stick-figures of a chair. [See Eleanor Rosch on prototypes.] And you can build constraints into models, e.g., male and female. [I didn’t get this.]

Accessibility. Internal research from Youtube built a model for recommending videos. Initially it just looked at how many users watched it. You get better results if you look not just at the clicks but the lifetime usage by users. [Again, I didn’t get that accurately.]

Google open-sourced Tensor Flow, Google’s AI tool. “People have been using it from everything to to sort cucumbers, or to track the husbandry of cows.”People have been using it from everything to to sort cucumbers, or to track the husbandry of cows. Google would never have thought of this applications.

AutoML: learning to learn. Can we figure out how to enable ML to learn automatically. In one case, it looks at models to see if it can create more efficient ones. Google’s AIY lets DIY-ers build AI in a cardboard box, using Raspberry Pi. John also points to an Android app that composes music. Also, Google has worked with Geena Davis to create sw that can identify male and female characters in movies and track how long each speaks. It discovered that movies that have a strong female lead or co-lead do better financially.

He ends by emphasizing Google’s commitment to open sourcing its tools and research.

 


 

Fernanda and Martin talk about the importance of visualization. (If you are not familiar with their work, you are leading deprived lives.) When F&M got interested in ML, they talked with engineers. ““ML is very different. Maybe not as different as software is from hardware. But maybe. ”ML is very different. Maybe not as different as software is from hardware. But maybe. We’re just finding out.”

M&F also talked with artists at Google. He shows photos of imaginary people by Mike Tyka created by ML.

This tells us that AI is also about optimizing subjective factors. ML for everyone: Engineers, experts, lay users.

Fernanda says ML spreads across all of Google, and even across Alphabet. What does PAIR do? It publishes. It’s interdisciplinary. It does education. E.g., TensorFlow Playground: a visualization of a simple neural net used as an intro to ML. They opened sourced it, and the Net has taken it up. Also, a journal called Distill.pub aimed at explaining ML and visualization.

She “shamelessly” plugs deeplearn.js, tools for bringing AI to the browser. “Can we turn ML development into a fluid experience, available to everyone?”
What experiences might this unleash, she asks.

They are giving out faculty grants. And expanding the Brain residency for people interested in HCI and design…even in Cambridge (!).

Leave a Reply


Web Joho only

Comments (RSS).  RSS icon