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June 24, 2012

[2b2k] How much info per minute, per an infographic

There’s a fun infographic — and aren’t all infographics fun, one way or another? — at Visual News about how much information is made every minute.

It’s poorly sourced (a list of sources at the bottom without references to which data came from which sources, and no links, but, heck infographics are fun!), but let’s assume/pretend that it’s accurate. Beyond the pure massiveness of the amount of data, a couple of “facts” leap out (and these are especially unreliable since they probably come from different sources so the comparisons are likely to be apples to orangutans, but it’s all about putting the “fun” into infungraphics!):

  • There are three times as many tweets as Facebook Likes, even though one is just a no-thought reaction (and the other requires pressing the Like button — heyo! I kid Twitter ’cause I love it. I’ll be @dweinberger all week.)

  • There are 80x more posts on Tumblr than on WordPress

  • There are 2,000x more emails sent than Tweets posted, and 100x more emails sent than search queries received by Google. This seems plausible if I look at my own usage, but I’m old and thus more attached to email than are today’s Digital Youngsters with their IMs and their hiphop ringtones and 4Gs. Nope, email remains the volume leader in terms of number of units (as opposed to the number of bytes, which I cannot figure out).

Info fun! With air quotes around each of those two words!

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February 7, 2010

How to send email using RealBasic

It took a bunch of googling (thanks!) and some experimentation, but the following seems to work on a Mac (snow leopard) to send email programmatically, using RealBasic:

Dim mail as EmailMessage
Dim SMTPSocket1 as SMTPSocket

// create an instance:
SMTPSocket1 = new SMTPSocket

// The name of an available SMTP server:
SMTPSocket1.address = “smtp.YOURSERVER.com”
// The port number of the server:
SMTPSocket1.port = 25
// Your username for the server, if nec.
SMTPSocket1.Username=”[email protected]
// Your password:
SMTPSocket1.Password=”yourpwd”

// Create a new message:
mail = New EmailMessage
// The address you want it to come from:
mail.fromAddress= “[email protected]
mail.subject= “Your Subject”
// The message:
mail.bodyPlainText = “Testing. Testing. Is this thing on?”
// Alternatively, encode message in HTML:
mail.BodyHTML = “<u>Testing</u> Is this thing <blink>on</blink>?”
// If you want a header:
mail.headers.appendHeader “X-Mailer”,”REALbasic SMTP”

// The address you’re sending it to:
mail.AddRecipient “[email protected]
// cc someone:
mail.addCCRecipient “[email protected]

// Add it to list of messages:
SMTPSocket1.messages.append mail
// Send message:
SMTPSocket1.SendMail

// Wait for the sending to be done if you’re going to send another
while SMTPSocket1.BytesLeftToSend > 0
  SMTPSocket1.poll
wend

Please correct any boneheaded errors I’ve made. Thanks.

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November 3, 2009

Why sending large attachments sucks, but we’ll keep doing it anyway

The Google Operating System blog (independent of Google) has a useful post explaining why it’s a bad idea to send large attachments, even though Google now lets you attach files up to 25MB in size.

The reasons the post gives have to do with how inefficient attachments are for the system: They get expanded and require multiple uncached downloads. But, those reasons won’t carry a lot of water for people who just want to send their 25MB Powerpoint presentation to 35 people who simply have to see it. (Mea culpa. Except these days it’d be Keynote for me … which seems to make much larger files than Powerpoint.) Until we come up with an easier way to send around files — or a way that adds enough other benefits — we’re going to be wrapping our attachment anvils in brown paper and twine, sticking stamps on them, and sending them through the emails just like God and Google intended.

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October 30, 2009

Argument by analogy

A judge has ruled that email is not protected under the Fourth Amendment. This sounds wrong to me (although I am very much not a lawyer), but what I really enjoy are the many many arguments by analogy as slashdotters try to figure out what email is like, so we can see what privacy expectations to port over from the familiar world of telephones, Fedex trucks, and glass-bottom boats.

I’m not saying there’s a better way to figure this out. I just enjoy watching us flounder our way through ethical dilemmas.

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